The TDF Theatre Dictionary Blog

Official news and announcements.

beat

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term beat.

On beat’s official page, we define the term as “an added pause to a line or action, or a shift in intention or emotion.” But now we want to know what the term beat means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you ever noticed a performer take an awkward beat? What exactly happened?

– Do you ever find yourself taking a beat in everyday conversations?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term beat, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

Aerial Theatre -- ARTICLE PHOTO

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term aerial theatre.

On aerial theatre’s official page, we define the term as “scripted or devised theatre that incorporates aerial work to heighten and further the narrative.” But now we want to know what the term aerial theatre means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you ever seen a production that you’d categorize as aerial theatre? What was it and how did you like it?

– Is there a show you’d love to see revived with aerial elements?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term aerial theatre, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

10.out.of.12

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term 10 Out of 12.

On 10 Out of 12′s official page, we define the term as “a 12-hour rehearsal day in which 10 hours are spent working on lights, sound, costumes, and other technical elements.” But now we want to know what the term 10 Out of 12 means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you ever been part of a 10 Out of 12 rehearsal, either as a performer, designer, stage manager, or other crew?

– What’s the craziest 10 Out of 12 story you have? Did scenery or lights fall? Did a performer throw a tantrum?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term 10 Out of 12, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

kitchen.sink.realism.cropped

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term kitchen sink realism.

On kitchen sink realism’s official page, we define the term as a style of drama that realistically depicts the gritty lives of its characters that frequently involves crying, shouting, and broken dreams. But now we want to know what the term kitchen sink realism means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you seen any shows that qualify as kitchen sink realism? What were they?

– Do you feel like kitchen sink realism is still relevant today, or do you find it dated?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term kitchen sink realism, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

special.skills.cropped

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term special skills.

On special skills’ official page, we define the term as skills a performer has other than acting that might help him get the part. But now we want to know what the term special skills means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Whether or not you’re an actor, do you know how to do something that would be considered a special skill?

– What’s the strangest special skill you’ve seen used in a show?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term special skills , then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

asides.final

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term asides.

On asides’s official page, we define the term as a remark made by a character directly to the audience that is not heard by the other characters onstage. But now we want to know what the term asides means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you ever seen a particularly memorable aside in a show? Was it a Shakespeare play or something else?

– How did this potent aside impact your perception of the character? Did you like him more or less?

– Do you have any funny anecdotes about wishing you could deliver an aside in real life?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term asides, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

going.up

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term going up.

On going up’s official page, we define the term as when an actor forgets a line in the middle of a performance. But now we want to know what the term going up means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you ever seen an actor go up in the middle of a show? What happened? Did the performer improvise or call for “line”?

– If you’re an actor, have you ever forgotten your lines during a performance? How did you handle it?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term going up, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

environmental.theatre

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term environmental theatre.

On environmental theatre’s official page, we define the term as a style of production in which the audience inhabits the same space as the performance. But now we want to know what the term environmental theatre means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you ever seen an environmental theatre production? What was it?

– How did watching an environmental theatre show impact your experience as an audience member?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term environmental theatre, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

theatre.in.round

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term theatre-in-the-round.

On theatre-in-the-round’s official page, we define the term as a style of production in which the audience surrounds the performers. But now we want to know what the term theatre-in-the-round means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– Have you ever seen a production staged in the round? What was it?

– How did watching theatre-in-the-round impact your experience as an audience member?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term theatre-in-the-round, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor

exeunt

Welcome to the Theatre Dictionary’s conversation about the term exeunt.

On exeunt’s official page, we define the term as a stage direction indicating that several actors should leave the stage at once. But now we want to know what the term exeunt means to you. You can use the comments section to tell us.

– As a performer, have you ever encountered the term exeunt? Did you need to ask what it meant, or did you figure it out from the context (or because you were lucky enough to study Latin)?

– What other Latin stage directions have you seen in playscripts?

If you’d like to make a video of your own about the term exeunt, then we’d love to hear from you! Just email us through our contact page. Tell us about yourself and why you want to make a video. We’ll be in touch ASAP and give you details on how to add your video to the Theatre Dictionary!

Cheers,

Mark Blankenship, Theatre Dictionary editor